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The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of. Denmark. ASCII text placed in the public domain by Moby Lexical Tools, SGML markup by Jon Bosak,. Next day Hamlet utters his soliloquy, " To be or not to be," encounters Ophelia as arranged by. Polonius, gives his advice to the players, is present at. Hamlet, Prince of Denmark - William Shakespeare (–) was an English of Denmark - William Shakespeare - PDF Download Book Livro Baixar Online .


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He then wrote mainly tragedies until about , including Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth, considered some of the finest works in the Hamlet, Prince of Denmark - William Shakespeare - PDF Download Book Livro Baixar Online. Lecture on picscobenreatttas.ml - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online . BACHELARD Gaston - A Intuição Do Instante [Livro]. Uploaded by. Download Hamlet Drama em cinco Atos - William Shakespeare em ePUB, mobi e PDF.

Claudius, too, is a very shrewd and successful political operator, who understands, like Polonius, that the political world requires deception and betrayal. He employs Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to spy on Hamlet, agrees readily enough to Poloniuss various spying suggestions, and finally is prepared to deceive Hamlet into going to his own death.

This Machiavellian quality in Polonius and Claudius makes them very effective political operators. When Polonius challenges Claudius to name one occasion on which he has been wrong, Claudius concedes that Polonius is unmatched in his ability to find out the truth of a situation. Claudius, we know especially from his superb performance in 1. We should note, too, that Claudius has the full support of the court. That is a mark that he is recognized as an effective, perhaps even a popular leader.

No one in the play, except Hamlet, ever makes the suggestion that Claudius is not an effective monarch and Shakespeare in other plays typically allows us to see growing discontent in quiet conversations between malcontents. In fact, during the course of the play we see his policies about the political problems with Norway work to the evident approval of those around him. In this connection, its important to pick up on the fact that the monarch in Elsinore has been elected by the council. So Claudius is king because he was chosen by the senior politicians in Elsinore.

If he had wanted to, Shakespeare could obviously have provided clear evidence that people in general think that this remarriage was immoral. The fact that there is no such suggestion, that by and large everyone has approved of the remarriage is an important fact when we consider the extreme language with which the ghost and Hamlet describe it. For example, if the remarriage is truly incestuous, then there would have been hostility to it we see that the clergy here are not above challenging the court.

So the general harmony of the court, which we witness in the first scenes tells us that Claudius is perceived as an effective and perhaps even a popular ruler and that, so far we can tell, the people in Elsinore see nothing wrong with the marriage.

Introductory Lecture on Shakespeares Hamlet

One final point about the political world of Elsinore. It does not seem to be a place where women matter very much, where they have much of a say in anything.

The movers and shakers in this world are all men, and where necessary they are prepared to use women, even their own family, in the power political game.

The chief example of this, of course, is Ophelia, who spends much of the play bewildered about what is happening around her, as she tries to follow what her father, brother, and Hamlet tell her to do. Gertrude, too, initiates very little from any political power base.

In Elsinore, Claudius and Polonius call the shots. But Claudius does love Gertrude and respects her opinion. He clearly has all the power, but he often involves her in the conversations, asks her advice, and defers to her. Early in the play, the stand together as equals.

Gertrude appears to have very little political imagination she is not a power player and at times is clearly out of the loop , and we dont get any suggestion that she knows anything about the murder of her first husband. The fact that Claudius makes so much of her is one of those qualities that makes Claudius, in some ways, a more sympathetic character much here obviously depends upon how they behave together, so that we have to witness a production to make an informed judgment.

And both women die. Ophelias death is particularly significant, because she is clearly driven to it by events over which she, as a young woman, has no control. In this connection it might be worth asking some pointed questions about Ophelia as a victim of life in Elsinore and, in particular, of Hamlet himself.

If we see her, as I think most people do, as an innocent young girl trying to sort out her feelings about people in a complex and difficult world where she is constantly told what to do and how to think by various men Hamlet, Polonius, and Laertes , and if there is some substance to the love between her and Hamlet, there may very well be an explicit sexual edge to the frustration which drives her into madness.

That seems certainly possible in the light of the sexual bullying not too strong a term which seems to be such a constant feature of the advice men around constantly direct at her, and the sexual innuendo in her lunatic songs lends support to the idea..

Such a view gives some weight to Robert Speaights remark that no part in Shakespeare has suffered more than Ophelia from the sentimental evasion of sexuality a comment recorded in Peter Brook: A Biography by J. Trewin, London, Macdonald, , p.

We dont have to see Ophelia this way, of course, but if we give her behaviour that edge something entirely consistent with the evidence of the text her destruction acts as a powerful indictment of the corrupting effects of the male-dominated political realm of Elsinore, which simply has no room in it for love. Appearance and Reality Given this nature of Elsinore, which is impossible to ignore, we come to a second important fact of the play, namely, that people in this world have to live two lives, the one they present to the world and the inner world of their own thoughts and feelings.

For Elsinore is a world where the appearance of things does not always or often mesh with the inner reality. Claudius, for example, is on the outside a smooth, popular, and effective political operator inside he is tormented by his own guilt and carries, as he puts it, the most serious sin of all, a brothers murder. Polonius appears to be something of a bumbling fool inside he is a capable Machiavel always unerringly on the trail of new information.

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are apparently Hamlets university friends but in reality they are spies in the service of Claudius, especially commissioned to ferret out the truth about Hamlet.

And so forth. This is a deceptive world. One can never be sure whether someone is spying or eavesdropping. Elsinore is full of nooks, arrases, upper galleries where someone may be lurking in secret. Its a place where you have to keep your wits about you if you want to survive.

When someone approaches you with a smile on his face, you can never be sure whether he is a friend or a foe, whether what he is saying to you is what he really means or whether it is all just a temporary role he is playing in this dangerous and duplicitous game. In this connection, I think one of the most important moments is the very first line of the play.

In the first scene we see someone whom we dont know alone, wandering about in the dark, cold and lonely and scared in a foggy night, where one has difficulty seeing clearly. Suddenly a figure emerges out of the mist. The first response is defensive: Whos there? And figure hailed is equally suspicious: Nay, answer me. Stand and unfold yourself. And if you read the scene aloud, you notice in the short, choppy lines a nervous intensity, a jitteriness, which sets the mood for the world of Elsinore.

In one way or another that question Whos there? Who in this play is not acting a role? Well, those that do not seem to be, that is, Ophelia and Gertrude and perhaps Horatio, stand rather on the sidelines or get pushed around by the action.

Ophelia, in particular, is a really pathetic victim of so many people in the play, because she is so innocent, so naive, so ill equipped to understand, let alone deal with, the world around her. In this world, as in so much of Shakespeare, innocence is never enough, and those who have only that to guide them in a complex political world, who are not able to develop a survival strategy of some kind, are going to suffer.

Gertrude, too, appears much of the time painfully bewildered. Those two ladies are poorly equipped to deal with Elsinore, in part because they cannot hide their feelings in an effective public role. One key element in the roles people play is the language they use to interact with others. In public, Claudius is smooth, polished, confident in private or with Gertrude he is a troubled spirit in public Polonius is frequently something of a verbal buffoon in private he is matter of fact and shrewd.

His famous antic disposition is part of a world where you have to play a public role in order to guard your innermost thoughts and plans. He clearly uses his famous wit to erect a defensive barrier between himself and others and at times to lash out cruelly at them. That is the reason why, in reading Hamlet, we have to be very careful about immediately believing what people say to each other: they may not be telling the truth. That may also be the reason why everyone enjoys the arrival of the actors so much.

Hamlet is never happier in this play than when he is with the actors. He gets excited and, for the first time, displays a passionate and joyful interest in something going on around him. With the actors we do get our only strong sense of what a giving and amusing character Hamlet might be.

And this has nothing to do with his plans for the play within the play that comes later.

No, the suggestion is clearly that he can in some ways deal with the actors differently from anyone else. With them, and this is very noticeable in the scene, Hamlet can relax and let his imagination, wit, and intelligence play without worrying about the consequences. And I would suggest that in a world like Elsinore, where almost everyone is playing various roles in a dangerous game, the professional actors are a huge relief because you know exactly where you stand with them.

They do not conceal the fact that they are taking on roles there is thus nothing duplicitous about them. Those who professionally pretend to be other people are, in a sense, the only ones in this play whose actions one can clearly sort out, because they are what they appear to be, with no inner agenda working against the role they play.

Hamlets Relationship to Elsinore The third fact about this play which I would like to consider is particularly obvious: that in some fundamental way Hamlet feels alienated in the court of Elsinore.

He physically and emotionally refuses to take part in the proceedings, and generally acknowledges to others that he is profoundly dissatisfied with the court, with Denmark, and even with life itself. This is made very clear to us before he learns anything about the ghost, the murder, and the need for revenge. The first soliloquy in 1. The behaviour of Hamlet towards the normal business going on at Elsinore is a source of great puzzlement to his mother and to Claudius.

Now, a great deal of the interpretation we favour about this play is going to turn on how we deal with this displacement of Hamlet from the normal world around him. Prima facie, it strikes me that there are three immediately obvious possibilities.

My description of these is going to be oversimple, but I think it will be enough to make the point and perhaps get your interpretative imaginations working. Some Interpretative Possibilities Given these facts, there are a number of routes we might explore and which have been explored to seek to find some interpretative unity in this frequently ambiguous work. The following list is not meant to be exhaustive, but it does chart some of the main paths interpreters have followed: Hamlet as a Noble Prince in a Corrupt and Evil World First, we can see Elsinore as an essentially corrupt place, an environment in which the nobler aspects of human life have been hopelessly compromised by the excessive attention to duplicity, double dealing, and Machiavellian politics, that, in a sense, Claudius and Polonius are clearly the villains of the place and wholly responsible for the unsatisfactory moral and emotional climate there they are the source of the something rotten in the state of Denmark.

If that is so, if, that is, we see Elsinore and the prevailing powers in it, Claudius and Polonius, as in some sense degenerate specimens of humanity, then Hamlets rejection of that world becomes something with which we can sympathize.

He is right to feel about that world the way he does his inability to adjust to an evil environment is a sign of his noble nature.

He is being emotionally hammered by a cruel and corrupt world, and he is trying to hang onto his integrity. Such an approach would make much of Hamlets apparently philosophical nature, his intellectual superiority which enables him to place the actions of Elsinore in a much wider and fairer context.

And it would emphasize the degenerate nature of Claudius and Polonius. Given this quality, we readily enough understand why Hamlet cannot accept a world of deceit, compromise, and short-term power grabs. He has to displace himself from this world in order to survive, in order to protect himself from the general rottenness, while he tries to sort out how he is to act in a world which he finds so morally unacceptable.

Such an initial displacement would of course be powerfully reinforced by the news about the murder, since it would simply confirm for Hamlet the nature of the world he does not want to enter. So his anguish comes from the inner conflict of a spirit who wants to understand the ultimate significance of human actions, especially his own, before acting in a world empty, so far as he can see, of significant value.

He has looked at life in Elsinore and has become disgusted by what he sees, and we can sympathize with that because Elsinore is, thanks to the actions of particular people, an evil place. This stance, one might maintain, is the source of Hamlets cruelty and he can be very cruel, especially to Ophelia. Once he suspects that she is complicit in the corruption around her, he lashes out.

Whatever hopes he might have entertained about there being an alternative to the world he sees around him have been disappointed she is part of the problem and must be pushed away. Similarly Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, in his view, betray his friendship and thus deserve to be dealt with harshly. His rough treatment of his mother, too, may well stem from a sense that she has collaborated in the murder of his father he virtually accuses her of the deed, although it seems clear to us from her reply that that is the first she has heard of that matter , and her remarriage is a constant reminder of the emptiness of promises and honest relationships in the world of the court.

Other books: HAMLET PDF DEUTSCH

In this connection, its worth remarking that Hamlet never finally decides to kill Claudius, formulating a plan and carrying it out. Then he kills, just as he killed Polonius, with a spontaneous speed that does not pause to ground itself in reason. What this establishes about the moral quality of the Princes character, Im not sure, but it is a significant fact of the play. Hamlet as a Death-Infected Source of the Rottenness in Elsinore A second possibility concerning Hamlets estrangement from the goings on in Elsinore is that the source of the problem is not the corruption in Elsinore but some deep inadequacy in Hamlet himself.

The world of Elsinore is indeed full of compromises and evasions and political intrigue. But it is a recognizably normal adult world, and it does possess some important worth in the love of Gertrude and Claudius, in the respect and popularity of Claudius, in his political effectiveness, and perhaps in the loyalty of Polonius to the King and in his concern for his own family even if we find that concern often overly pragmatic and emotionally limiting.

Hamlets displacement from that world is thus, not so much an indication of his noble, sympathetic character, as a sign of his emotional or intellectual inadequacy. He is, more than anyone else, the source of something rotten in the state of Denmark. In exploring this possibility we might like to consider, for example, that Hamlet is a multiple killer, who takes seven lives for one. He kills without any compunction, a response that surprises even Horatio. He has what one critic Wilson Knight has called a death infected imagination, always dwelling on the futility, aridity, and pointlessness of life.

Far from having an uplifting philosophical or poetical nature, he is morbidly obsessed with the fact that he can find no adequate reason for living in the he world. He is also, in a very real sense, the biggest liar in the play. For all his talk of the deceptive world of Elsinore and the tactics of Polonius, Hamlet himself is always acting, deceiving, lying, shielding himself from people and using people to promote his own ends. And most significant of all, he has a very warped sense of female sexuality, talking of it always in gross terms which indicate an enormous disgust.

Hamlets actions are destructive of others and ultimately self-destructive. For example, in any comparison between Claudius and Hamlet as moral creatures, it would not be hard to make the case that Claudius is clearly the superior of the two, with a much more intelligent sense of personal responsibility and a searing sense of his own sinfulness.

This line of interpretation would encourage us to see in Hamlets cruelty to Ophelia, to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, and to Gertrude the expression of a sensibility corrupted by its own inadequate feelings. His disgust for female sexuality, for example, would stem from a basic immaturity rather than from a sense of betrayal.

Romeo and Juliet - William Shakespeare (in English)

Hamlet cannot accept that his mother is a creature with an active sexual life. And he cannot accept that because he has come to see sexuality as something depraved, animal like, and disgusting.

The response to such feelings is to lash out at her verbally and perhaps even physically. Its particularly interesting that the only other person to talk with such disgust about sexuality is the ghost. And if we are interested in the origins of Hamlets emotionally insecure nature, that scene with his father is of pivotal importance. We know that Hamlet idealizes his father excessively constantly comparing him to a god , and in the similarity of their sentiments on some things and even in their manner of frequently speaking in triplets Words, words, words, Remember me, remember me, remember me, and so on , there seems to be a strong link between the two, as if to underscore the idea that for the deficiencies of Hamlets character, his father bears a major responsibility.

Those who favour this sense of a significantly corrupting quality in Hamlets character and who wish to link it to his parentage often cite as the theme of the play a particularly interesting passage which comes just before the appearance of the ghost: So, oft it chances in particular men, That for some vicious mole of nature in them, As, in their birthwherein they are not guilty, Since nature cannot choose his origin By the o'ergrowth of some complexion, Oft breaking down the pales and forts of reason, Or by some habit that too much o'er-leavens The form of plausive manners, that these men, Carrying, I say, the stamp of one defect, Being nature's livery, or fortune's star,-Their virtues else--be they as pure as grace, As infinite as man may undergo-Shall in the general censure take corruption From that particular fault: the dram of eale Doth all the noble substance of a doubt To his own scandal.

Enter Ghost 1. The fact that he makes this speech just before the encounter with his father would seem to underline the fact that there might be a vicious mole of nature in the character of Hamlet Senior or Hamlet junior or both this device of making the speech immediately before the entry of a character carry a strong ironic implication about that character is very common in Shakespeare..

I should mention here that one very important decision one has to make in ones imaginative interpretation of these two possibilities is Hamlets age. For that is going to determine to a large extent whether we see his reaction to Elsinore as something with which we can readily sympathize or as something fundamentally immature or emotionally inappropriate. Now, we are told Hamlets precise age by the gravedigger, of course, but that piece of specific information is often overlooked in the interests of a particular interpretation.

If, on the other hand, he is in his mid- thirties then this response might seem an overreaction, something about which we would expect someone at that stage of life to have reached a more mature understanding. He might still find it very distasteful, but it would not paralyze his emotional faculties in quite the same way as in an adolescent, unless there were something wrong.

The Real Villain: The Condition of the World A third possibility to account for Hamlets odd relationship with the court at Elsinore there are others , and the one I tend to favour, is that this is a particularly bleak play in which all the characters, in one way or another, fail, because in the world of Elsinore there is no possibility for a happy fulfilled life the conditions of life are loaded against the participants and, in a sense, they are all victims of a world which will just not admit of the possibilities for the good life in any creative and meaningful sense.

I find, for example, that in the world of Elsinore my sympathies are constantly aroused and then canceled out in various ways. I admire and respect Claudius at first, I respond with admiration to his evident love and affectionate and courteous treatment of Gertrude, but I recognize that he is an evil man, guilty of a horrible crime, and then I see him wrestling with an enormous guilt, which is a factor only because he is a deeply religious person who believes in his own damnation and will not take an easy way out.

This is not a simple villain, but a complex human being locked into a situation where there is simply nothing he can do. Hamlet, similarly, constantly arouses conflicting responses. One of the great attractions of this play is the protean quality of the Princes character.

His mind is always interesting, and his suffering is very genuine. Like Claudius he is wrestling with the world, and he is not being very successful. He does not see any way out of his distress, and when he reflects on the final meaning of everything, he can reach no joyful conclusion. All of this makes Hamlet an immensely interesting and sympathetic character. On the other hand, he is so often brutal, in language and deed, especially to those who love him, he is so deceitful and vacillating, that again and again I find myself questioning his moral sensitivity.

Gertrude also is in a similar situation. In that sense. Allied to this feature. For Hamlet is not quite like these two in how his language registers. From his very first soliloquy in 1.

We can easily acknowledge that Elsinore is a very political place. This quality sets him apart from Richard and Jaques. With windlasses and with assays of bias. If one has to spread lies abroad in order to gain the knowledge necessary for power.

It may also account for his habit of lashing out verbally and sometimes physically when the world presses against him too closely and for the fact that such lashing out characteristically occurs in the face of those who love him most or who are most concerned about him.

Polonius dismisses the matter as rubbish: By indirection find directions out. This spirit is best exemplified in the person of Polonius. As often as not. When Ophelia confesses her love for Hamlet and his for her.

Hamlet shows little inclination to listen to other people sensitively and to learn from their conversations with him and if there is a sense that he frequently uses language as a shield to protect himself from interacting with the world as he clearly does with his often nonsensical patter. Gertrude and Ophelia.

If that means running the risk of dishonoring his son or using his daughter as bait. In this court. One needs to be constantly on guard. No one in the play. That is not the issue here. Thou canst not then be false to any man. He employs Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to spy on Hamlet. I think. He has the best interests of his family and his monarch at heart and puts his talents to work on their behalf.

The fact that he does not believe that dealing with people in this way is not being false to them tells us a great deal about Polonius and about the world in which he functions with such apparent success. Similarly in his famous speech to his son. And it must follow as the night the day. We should note. In fact. The implication is clear: He has no agenda to capture or wield more power than he has already. And there we can sense a shrewd and hard-headed political imagination for whom the all important issue of life is political survival in a complex and deceptive world.

In a sense. Set your entreatments at a higher rate Than a command to parley. It is the quality of the care. That is what seems curiously narrow. That is a mark that he is recognized as an effective.

An essential part of that is a deceptively innocent external mask. Claudius concedes that Polonius is unmatched in his ability to find out the truth of a situation. What he says is good hardheaded practical advice for success in a rough and dangerous public world: The most frequently quoted part of the speech one needs to consider very carefully: This above all--to thine own self be true.

This Machiavellian quality in Polonius and Claudius makes them very effective political operators. In exploring this issue. But in serving both his royal masters and his family. And he is both of those. So Claudius is king because he was chosen by the senior politicians in Elsinore. He sees himself as a loyal servant of the royal family and as a loving parent. When Polonius challenges Claudius to name one occasion on which he has been wrong.

But Claudius does love Gertrude and respects her opinion. For example. And both women die. That seems certainly possible in the light of the sexual bullying not too strong a term which seems to be such a constant feature of the advice men around constantly direct at her. Appearance and Reality Given this nature of Elsinore.

Gertrude appears to have very little political imagination she is not a power player and at times is clearly out of the loop. Who in this play is not acting a role? He clearly has all the power. Those two ladies are poorly equipped to deal with Elsinore. In this world.

When someone approaches you with a smile on his face. I think one of the most important moments is the very first line of the play. In Elsinore.

Ophelia and Gertrude and perhaps Horatio. The first response is defensive: The fact that Claudius makes so much of her is one of those qualities that makes Claudius. Suddenly a figure emerges out of the mist. It does not seem to be a place where women matter very much. Stand and unfold yourself. This is a deceptive world.

One key element in the roles people play is the language they use to interact with others. Shakespeare could obviously have provided clear evidence that people in general think that this remarriage was immoral.

And so forth. The chief example of this. A Biography by J. For Elsinore is a world where the appearance of things does not always or often mesh with the inner reality. Claudius is smooth. Elsinore is full of nooks. The movers and shakers in this world are all men. So the general harmony of the court.

If he had wanted to. Hamlet http: Early in the play. If we see her. Claudius and Polonius call the shots. One can never be sure whether someone is spying or eavesdropping. In this connection it might be worth asking some pointed questions about Ophelia as a victim of life in Elsinore and. In public. One final point about the political world of Elsinore.

The fact that there is no such suggestion. And it would emphasize the degenerate nature of Claudius and Polonius. Whatever it is that his holding him back from acting decisively in the political http: If that is so. He is being emotionally hammered by a cruel and corrupt world. He physically and emotionally refuses to take part in the proceedings.

With them. So his anguish comes from the inner conflict of a spirit who wants to understand the ultimate significance of human actions. Some Interpretative Possibilities Given these facts. The first soliloquy in 1. My description of these is going to be oversimple. He has looked at life in Elsinore and has become disgusted by what he sees.

The behaviour of Hamlet towards the normal business going on at Elsinore is a source of great puzzlement to his mother and to Claudius. And this has nothing to do with his plans for the play within the play that comes later. Given this quality. Claudius and Polonius. That may also be the reason why everyone enjoys the arrival of the actors so much.

This is made very clear to us before he learns anything about the ghost. He has to displace himself from this world in order to survive. Such an initial displacement would of course be powerfully reinforced by the news about the murder.

With the actors we do get our only strong sense of what a giving and amusing character Hamlet might be. His rough treatment of his mother. And I would suggest that in a world like Elsinore. Prima facie. Those who professionally pretend to be other people are. Hamlet is never happier in this play than when he is with the actors. Hamlet can relax and let his imagination. Once he suspects that she is complicit in the corruption around her.

This stance. That is the reason why. He gets excited and. The following list is not meant to be exhaustive. Similarly Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. The response to such feelings is to lash out at her verbally and perhaps even physically.

Hamlet himself is always acting. I say. We know that Hamlet idealizes his father excessively constantly comparing him to a god. Oft breaking down the pales and forts of reason. His disgust for female sexuality. Being nature's livery. In exploring this possibility we might like to consider.

As infinite as man may undergo-Shall in the general censure take corruption From that particular fault: He kills without any compunction. For all his talk of the deceptive world of Elsinore and the tactics of Polonius. For that is going to determine to a large extent whether we see his reaction to Elsinore as something with which we can readily sympathize or as something fundamentally immature or emotionally inappropriate.

Hamlet cannot accept that his mother is a creature with an active sexual life. Then he kills. Or by some habit that too much o'er-leavens The form of plausive manners. He is also. Enter Ghost 1. And he cannot accept that because he has come to see sexuality as something depraved.

That for some vicious mole of nature in them. The fact that he makes this speech just before the encounter with his father would seem to underline the fact that there might be a vicious mole of nature in the character of Hamlet Senior or Hamlet junior or both this device of making the speech immediately before the entry of a character carry a strong ironic implication about that character is very common in Shakespeare.

Far from having an uplifting philosophical or poetical nature. He is. The world of Elsinore is indeed full of compromises and evasions and political intrigue. And most significant of all. Since nature cannot choose his origin— By the o'ergrowth of some complexion. But it is a recognizably normal adult world. And what does he do? He sings. He does not see any way out of his distress. The first is essentially a spectator of life.

Gertrude also is in a similar situation. Who is happy in this play? Who has life figured out? I can see only one character leading a fully realized happy life. The latter is essentially a rhetorical defense.

I admire and respect Claudius at first. They all die in the mass killing at the end.

As You Like It - William Shakespeare (in English)

I respond with admiration to his evident love and affectionate and courteous treatment of Gertrude. Life is too much for them. And those who try to demand more from life.

Once I have seen Hamlet Senior and heard him talk. This is not a simple villain. He will lecture her. Life is too much for her. This is a world which does not admit complex. But life is denying her that. Like Claudius he is wrestling with the world. But that requires him to see his mother as the guilty party.

The fact that Hamlet Senior is consistently motivated more by a desire to hurt Gertrude for loving another man than to avenge his own murder simply confirms in my mind the overwhelmingly hard egocentricity and misogyny of the famous king.

PDF - Hamlet's Hit Points

I have immense sympathy for Gertrude and no difficulty at all in understanding how she could really love a man like Claudius. The two main survivors. But the two men in her life are on a downward spiral and so is she.

But he is only a gravedigger. Life does not seem to trouble him because he comes across as an unreflecting man who asks nothing of life except that it provides him with some barren ground which he and his troops can fight over in the name of military glory.

What she seems to want is something very basic: His mind is always interesting. He spends his life surrounded by death. What sense of moral order does he bring with him?

None whatsoever. As an obedient son. He is the only person in the play with a creative sense of humour. He might still find it very distasteful. It also makes very suspect the extraordinarily idealized vision of the dead king which Hamlet carries around.

Horatio and Fortinbras. I find. She genuinely loves Hamlet and Claudius. It answers only to the realities of military power. On the other hand. The Real Villain: Whether they embrace the conditions of Elsinore. The other is a mindless romantic militarist.

All of this makes Hamlet an immensely interesting and sympathetic character. When Fortinbras takes over Elsinore at the end of the play. My own sense of the ghost is that Hamlet Senior was something of a nasty piece of work--an egocentric.

Perhaps this is a place where he knows his authority is suspect. Hamlet Senior. What matters is not the Jacobean view of the supernatural but our response to this Ghost as a dramatic character. That interpretation makes this play a particularly bitter and despairing vision of life. But he is not going to face his wife.

He wants to stop the conversation between Hamlet and Gertrude and get Hamlet back on the focused track of revenge. And he certainly does not want some revelation of his relationship with Gertrude to be given to his son Hamlet. Why then has he come?He has now wait for it a classical Oedipus Complex: he is incapable of killing the man who sleeps with his mother because that would mean that he would have to admit to himself his own feelings about her, something which overwhelms him and disgusts him.

At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. Sometime between and , he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part-owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. Such appeals can be used to prove almost anything about the Ghost. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith.

A todos nossos agradecimentos. When Hamlet says something. Hamlet, similarly, constantly arouses conflicting responses.

CARLOTA from Portsmouth
Also read my other articles. I'm keen on collecting antiques. I do love dreamily .
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